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Muster Roll of Company A - Macon County Guards

 Tenth Battalion, Georgia Volunteer Infantry

The muster roll below is copied for personal research only from Georgia Confederate Soldiers 1861-1865 - Unit Roster Volume III [pp.419-420] edited by Janet B. Hewett, arranged by Joyce Lawrence, published by Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, NC, 1998, AND AUGMENTED with information compiled from letters, pensions, obituaries and other documents. See Sources below. Thanks go to Dennis Miller, John Griffin, Davine Campbell et al. --Steve Scroggins

Formation & Organization | Orders & Movements | Soldier's Letters | Obituaries | Top


22nd Battn GA Heavy Artillery - Co. B | 59th GA Infantry Regiment - Co.C


Company "A", 10th Battallion GA Volunteer Infantry

Officers:

FREDERICK, James D., Capt.,
promoted to Major 22-Jun-1864, commander of 10th Battn upon the death of Major Rylander. Mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters.

HILL, Caleb F., Lieutenant
(later promoted to Captain and commander of 10th Battn.) Mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters

MAFFITT, David T., 1st Lt.

WHITCHARD, John, Captain, AQM

Sergeants

BRYAN, Jasper N., 1st Sgt.

FINCH, James S., Sgt.

MOORE, Robert S., 1st Sgt.

RASCO, James L., Sgt.

SURLS, John F., Sgt.

WELLS, James W., 1st Sgt.

 

Corporals

BARFIELD, William P., Cpl.

HAND, Joseph R. (Davine Campbell) - [Dr. Joseph Ross Hand, Sr. was born on 2-19-1817, son of Henry Harrison Hand and his 2nd wife, Charity (Thompson) Hollingsworth/Hand and died 2-16-1862. It is not thought that he died as a result of the War. He and his wife Elizabeth Wells are buried in a private Cemetery
near Garden Valley, Ga. Dr. Hand was shown with parents in the 1830 Houston Co. GA census, and he married Elizabeth Wells, d/o David Wells and Barbara (Hiley) Wells about 1840 in Houston Co.

DURHAM, Obadiah T., Cpl 

TAYLOR, Edwin J.,Cpl.

Privates:

ALEXANDER, L.J.

ARCHER, Benjamin F.

BARFIELD, Alexander

BARFIELD, Jesse Bud (obituary) - one of 4-5 men who transferred to Co. B 22nd Battn GA Heavy Artillery. Died 16-Jan-1905. Burial at Barfield-Shepherd Cemeteries, Whitewater Creek, off GA. 127  Transfer info.

BARFIELD, Nelson H. (obituary) Died 6-Jul-1917. Buried at Ideal Cemetery. Applied for Pension in Macon Co. GA. Signed as Co. A Pension witness for James White of Taylor Co., John T. Lockwood of Walker Co., Mrs. O.C. Hill of Macon Co. GA Married Elizabeth Jane Lockwood d/o William W. Lockwood and Mary Ann (Polly) Childs.>> Nelson's sister, Rose Ann Barfield, married Jeptha Newton 03June1866. Newton served in Co F (Taylor Guards) of the GA 27th Inf. Reg. -- Kenree30@aol.com

BARNES, John

BARNES, William

BEDENBAUGH, Jacob W.

BEDEBBAUGH, Mathias H.

BOWMAN, John

BRADY, Robert

BREWER, John W.

BRIDGES, Benjamin

BRIDGES, Clinton H.

BRIDGES, John

BRIDGES, M.

BROWN, J.W.

BROWN, Larkin S., Music - mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters.

BRUMBLES, James N.

BRYAN, Francis M.

BRYAN, James W.

BRYAN, Josephus

BRYAN, Little J.

BRYAN, Robert

BRYAN, William D.

BRYAN, Young N.

BURKE, Boethius E.

CARNOLD, William

COOGLE, James B.

COOGLE, Jesse M.

COX, James C.

CROCKER, Evans J.

CULPEPPER, Davis J.

DANIEL, James F.

DIXON, Guin

DIXON, Hilliard

DIXON, James O.

DIXON, James T.

DIXON, Lemon R.

DOUGLASS, George A.

DRAUGHON, Solomon T.

DUNCAN, Henry R.

DUNCAN, John G.

DUNCAN, William F. - mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters.

DURHAM, William B.

EDGE, Arnuldus B. - transferred from Co. B 22nd Battn Heavy ArtilleryTransferinfo

EDGE, Daniel M.

EDGE, William O.

FOREHAND, Thomas J.

FULFORD, Henry F.

FULFORD, Thomas

GARDNER, Henry N.

GAY, W.P.

GREEN, Henry C.

HAMBRICK, Michael L. - wrote numerous letters shown below, died April 1863.

HILL, O.C. - N.H. Barfield signed widow's pension application for Mrs. O.C.Hill.

LOCKWOOD, John T. - Nelson H. Barfield (husband of Elizabeth Jane Lockwood) signed his Pension application from Walker Co. GA as witness.

MARTIN, James H.

MARTIN, William J.

McBRIDE, John H.

McBRIDE, Peter T.

McCARTHY, James V.

McCAY, Burrell

MEEKS, Henry

MEEKS, J.M.

MELVINE, George

MIMS, John - mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters.

MOSELEY, S.F.

MOTT, Zachariah (Zack) - mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters.

OGBURN, William F.E.

OLIVER, John T. - mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters

OLIVER, Joseph B.

OLIVER, William H. - married Ada Barfield, sister of Jesse Bud Barfield.

PARTRIDGE, Epluribus

PASSMORE, James P.

PASSMORE, Joseph W.

PAYNE, John T.

POWELL, James A.

RAWLS, Elijah J., Surgeon

RAY, Dempsey A.

RAY, John T.

ROBBINSON, William A.

RODGERS, Amos

RODGERS, David C.

SHEALY, George C.

SIMPSON, WILLIAM T.

SKINNER, N.T.

SMITH, Andrew J.

SMITH, J.L.

SMITH, Jacob B.

SMITH, James W.

SMITH, John D.

SMITH, John S.

SOUTER, Jacob W. - transferred to Co. B 22nd Battn GA Heavy Artillery. Mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters

SOUTER, John W. - transferred to Co. B 22nd Battn GA Heavy Artillery. Married Elizabeth Barfield, sister of Jesse Bud Barfield.

STALNAKER, Joseph P. - born 1844 died December 19, 1918. Buried Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Taylor Co. GA - gravestone provided by  Wallace-Edwards Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy on July 18, 1999.

STRANGE, Henry W.

STRICKLAND, Samuel F.

SUBER, Abram F.

SUBER, John W.

TARRER, Joseph H.

TAYLOR, Henry W.

TAYLOR, Isaiah J.

TAYLOR, Spencer C.

TAYLOR, William T.

THOMAS, William

THORNTON, John M.

THORNTON, William T.

TURNER, Alonzo D.

TURNER, James A.

TURNER, John G.

TURNER, Nathaniel B., Music

WALKER, T.M.

WALLACE, James W.

WHATLEY, John - WHATLEY, John listed on 1860 Taylor Co. Census, [p.881 HN 357 FN342] as age 21 and as WHATLEY, John W. P., age 15 [p.834, HN51, FN47].

WHITE, James - mentioned in ML Hambrick's letters. Filed for Pension in Taylor Co. with N.H. Barfield as witness. Listed in 1860 Taylor Co. Census [p.864, HN257 FN241] as age 25, overseer for Samuel P. Corbin.

WILLIAMS, J.F.

WILLIAMS, Theodore M.

WILLIAMS, Thomas L.

WILLIAMSON, Joseph E.

WILLIAMSON, William A.

WORSHAM, Robert D

<end roster Company A>

 


Formation & Organization | Orders & Movements | Soldier's Letters | Obituaries | Top


Formation and Organization: The initial formation of the regiment came as the 3rd Battalion of Georgia Volunteers was organized 17 March1862 at Camp Stevens. Major John E. Rylander was the commander. William C. Tinsley was the Ensign, and the assistant quartermaster was J. W. Whitehead. Later it became designated the 10th Battalion of Georgia Volunteers.

Company A, Macon County Guards, Macon County men; was organized at Lanier, Macon County, Georgia with Captain James D. Frederick, Lieutenant Caleb F. Hill, and Lieutenant David T. Maffett. Company A formed first to be part of the 3rd battalion of Georgia Volunteers at Camp Stephens, Georgia on 17 March 1862 but then was assigned as part of the 10th Battalion. [Extracted from John Griffin's history]

Formation & Organization | Orders & Movements | Soldier's Letters | Obituaries | Top


Orders and Movements

Summary: The unit formed March 1862 at Camp Stephens. Ordered to Camp Oglethorpe, Macon, GA 14-May-1862. Ordered to Fredericksburg, VA 8-Dec-1862. Arrived Fredericksburg 26-Dec-1862 to relieve the 1st GA Regulars. Departed Fredericksburg for Richmond 17-Feb-1863. The battalion participated in the campaign against Suffolk. Near the end of the campaign, the battalion was ordered to Fort Powhatan on the James River as replacements for the 59th Georgia Infantry Regiment. The battalion stayed there for two months. Fell back to Petersburg, VA after abandoning Fort Powhatan. Mid-Aug-1863 ordered to Franklin, VA where the battalion stayed for eight months. Ordered to Lee's headquarters 16-April-1864 and attached to Wright's Brigade, Anderson's Division. The 10th Battalion saw action at Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Gaines Mill. The battalion suffered heavily losing 1/3 of its men on the 22nd & 23rd June 1864 near Petersburg. Sources state that 81 men were killed and/or wounded in action out of two hundred engaged. The battalion is reported doing picket duty on 30 July 1864 as part of Wright's Brigade. Fierce fighting ensued to hold the position occupied near Petersburg. The 10th remained in northern Virginia through 1864. Many men were disabled at the Battle of Saylor's Creek. Four officers and 155 men were present at the Appomattox surrender and for Lee's speech to the men 10-April-1865. [end summary]

The 10th Battalion, Georgia Volunteers remained at Camp Stephens until 14 May 1862 when it received orders to proceed to Macon, Georgia The battalion was sent there to guard several thousand federal prisoners at Camp Oglethorpe located near Macon and the supplies stored there.

Records show a Colonel Brown of the 59th Regiment Georgia Volunteers and Major Rylander's 10th Georgia Battalion guarding prisoners at Macon. In correspondence dated 25 August 1862 the 10th Georgia Battalion and the 59th Georgia regiment are listed as guarding stores and prisoners in Macon and also in a report "Position of Troops in the Department of South Carolina and Georgia", dated 25 September 1862, as commanded by General G.T. Beauregard.

 In Special Orders 256, dated 1 November 1862, the 10th Battalion of Georgia Volunteers at Macon are ordered relieved from further duty and are to proceed to Winchester, VA to report for duty at the headquarters of General Robert E. Lee. In this order the 1st Regiment of Georgia Regulars will be relieved of duty with General Lee and will proceed to Macon, Georgia.

The 10th Battalion, Georgia Volunteers received orders on 8 December 1862 to proceed to Virginia to join Robert E. Lee's army at Fredericksburg. The Tenth battalion, after some delay caused by other orders, went to Virginia and joined Lee's army at Hamilton's crossing, 27 December 1862, just two weeks after the battle of Fredericksburg, relieving the First Georgia Regulars, who thereupon went to Georgia. The battalion was attached to General G.T. Anderson's Brigade, General Hoods Division, of General Longstreet's Corps.

Confederate Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland, Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern), And West Virginia.--#27 SPECIAL ORDERS No. 287. ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, December 8, 1862.

VI. The Tenth Battalion Georgia Volunteers, at Macon, Ga., will proceed at once to Fredericksburg, Va., and report to General R. E. Lee, commanding C. S. Army, &c., for duty with his army as heretofore ordered. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/2

Correspondence from Headquarters, Army of Northern Virginia, near Fredericksburg, dated 27 December 1862, stated the 10th Battalion of Georgia volunteers Commanded by Major Rylander arrived at Hamilton's Crossing on 26 December 1862 and reported in the morning in accordance with the Special Orders 287. The 10th Georgia Battalion was to relieve the 1st Regiment of Georgia Regulars which are now ordered to Danville, VA.

Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania From November 15, 1862, To January 26, 1863. CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#4 HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, Camp near Fredericksburg, December 27, 1862. General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, C. S. Army:

GENERAL: The Tenth Battalion Georgia Volunteers, under Major Rylander, arrived at Hamilton's Crossing last evening, and reported here this morning, in accordance with Paragraph VI, Special Orders, No. 287, from your office. Agreeably to the wishes of the honorable Secretary of War, as expressed in your letter of the 17th instant, the First Regiment Georgia Regulars have been ordered to proceed to Danville, Va., so soon as relieved by the Tenth Georgia Battalion. But in case the Department should wish to alter or modify the order, from any change in circumstances, the commanding officer has been directed to report to you in passing through Richmond, to receive your instructions. Most respectfully, in the temporary absence and by command of General Lee: W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General. (O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI)

The battalion marched from Fredericksburg on 17 February 1863 and proceeded to Richmond, VA. Folsom writes

"It (10th battalion) suffered incredible hardships and for five days was exposed to all the horrors of a Northern Virginia snow storm, without any shelter whatever from the bitter blast, which blew cold o'er that, now almost desolated region."

[Extracted from John Griffin's history]

In the letters home written by Michael L. Hambrick 1-Mar-1863, he describes the march from Fredericksburg:

"Dear Mother I again seat my self to drop you a few lines which leaves me well I hope these lines will come to hand and find you all enjoying the best of health I havent got nothing of importance to rite to you more than we have a great deal of bad weather here it is snowing and reigning nearly half the time but from what I have heard of the weather ther I think it has ben as cold there as it has here it aint half as cold here as I expected to find it we had a very bad time marching from Fredricks Burg we was five days on the road and 2 of them it reigned an snowed and the worst roads I ever saw in my life there is several of the boys went to the hosepittle sens we stopt but nun from our settlement but James White he had chills John Oliver is having the chills..." M. L. Hambrick [bold emphasis mine - letters from Georgia Archive courtesy of Dennis Miller --Steve Scroggins]

November 11, 1863, a number of men were transferred between Co.A of the 10th Batn to and from Co.B of the 22nd GA Batn Heavy Artillery:  "Adjutant & Inspector General's Office, Richmond, November 11, 1863. Special Orders No. 268"....para. XIX. "The following named privates are mutually transferred each to the others command, all parties consenting, provided no expense to the Confederate States be thereby incurred: J.B. Barfield, Company A, Tenth Battalion Georgia Volunteers; A.B. Edge, Company B, Twenty-second Battalion Georgia Artillery."  [Source:  Dennis Miller]

The battalion participated in the campaign against Suffolk. Near the end of the campaign, the battalion was ordered to Fort Powhatan on the James River as replacements for the 59th Georgia Infantry Regiment. The battalion stayed here for two months. Folsom wrote:

"This important position was held under the most trying circumstances for nearly two months"

The Union army developed plans to attack the fort by both land and water. They vastly superior numbers of Yankee troops caused General D.H. Hill to order the evacuation of the fort and the 10th Georgia Battalion fell back to Petersburg, VA. Around mid-August 1863 the unit was ordered to Franklin following numerous Union demonstrations upon the Blackwater line. The 10th Battalion of Georgia Volunteers stayed for eight months at Franklin. Again Folsom documented:

"For eight months it held this line, protecting the surrounding country from the hostile incursions of the enemy, with entire satisfaction to the commandant of the department."

Special Orders 89, Adjutant and Inspector General Office, Richmond, dated 16 April 1864, orders Major Rylander and his battalion to proceed by railroad to Headquarters, Department of Northern Virginia and report to General R.E. Lee for assignment to Brigadier General A.R. Wright's brigade, Anderson's Division of A.P. Hill Corps at Orange Courthouse.

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO APRIL 30, 1864.--#9 SPECIAL ORDERS No. 89. ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, April 16, 1864.

XLII. Col. George A. Gordon, commanding Sixty-third Georgia Volunteers, will proceed by railroad with his regiment to headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, and report to General R. E. Lee, commanding, &c., for assignment to Brig. Gen. A. R. Wright's brigade.

XLIII. Maj. J. E. Rylander will proceed by railroad with his battalion (the Tenth Georgia) to headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, and report to General R. E. Lee, commanding, &c., for assignment to Brig. Gen. A. R. Wright's brigade. By command of the Secretary of War: JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General. O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIII

In connection with division and brigade operations the 10th Battalion of Georgia Volunteers participated in most of the fiercely fought battles and fatiguing marches of this Virginia campaign. This includes a brave, but desperate charge of fortified Union positions a Spotsylvania Courthouse on 14 May 1864. Until their participation at this battle, the battalion's primary mission had been garrison, guard and picket duty.

On 2 June 1864, the commander, Major J.E. Rylander was killed at Cold Harbor or Gaines Mill. Folsom noted:

"It had the misfortune to lose its most efficient and gallant commanding officer, Major J. E. Rylander, who was instantly killed on that date. He was one of Georgia's most noble and worthy sons and in his fall the battalion has sustained a most serious loss."

The command was placed in charge of Major James D. Frederick following the death of Major Rylander.

The battalion suffered heavily losing one third of its men on the 22nd & 23rd June 1864 near Petersburg. Sources state that 81 men were killed and/or wounded in action out of two hundred engaged. There was a Confederate line from Halifax Road to Jerusalem Plank Road. Wilcox was next to Halifax Road and Mahone was next to Jerusalem Plank Road Johnson's House is in front of Wilcox's position on the morning of June 22. By 4:00 p.m. Wilcox has advanced past Johnson's House on it's left and turned to their left. A portion of Mahone's forces have advanced past the other side of the house and also turned left to face forces of Union General Barlow who advanced to keep them from flanking Birney Second Corp of Union troops.

Based on the 10th Battalion of Georgia Volunteers actions on 22 June 1864 General Wright complimented them for the men's dashing gallantry:

"That this little battalion deserves a great deal of credit, there can be no doubt, as its list of killed and wounded sufficiently attests, and it will be a matter of wonder to many of the readers of this work, that they ever managed to stand and be cut down as they were. The men were unused to fire, having been performing garrison duty almost from the time of its organization until the battle on the 14th of May, and could not be expected to bear themselves through the fight like the old veterans of Lee's Army; but they did stand, did fight and proved the efficiency of the noble material of which it is composed. They have reflected great credit upon their noble commander, who so bravely fighting fell on the 2nd of June. The present commander, Major Frederick is a young man of great promise, who will, with his noble battalion, yet win a fame in his country's service"

The battalion is reported doing picket duty on 30 July 1864 as part of Wright's Brigade. Report number 302 outlines some of the action near the Jerusalem Plank Road where the 10th Battalion of Georgia Volunteers were engaged. Wright's Brigade fought to reestablish the Confederate line as General Johnson will detail.

JUNE 13-JULY 31, 1864.--The Richmond (Virginia) Campaign. No. 302.--Reports of Maj. Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson, C. S. Army, commanding Johnson's division. Col. G. W. BRENT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

One gun of Davidson's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Otey, occupying a position on our main line on the right of the Baxter road--admirably adapted to throw canister-shot into the enemy's left flank, and with Wright's battery to sweep the ground in front of the breach with a destructive cross-fire--opened with a few rounds, and for some reason, not explained to me, became silent, and was deserted by the officers and men. This battery was connected with my command on the night of the 28th of July by the extension of my line to the right, and did not comprise a part of the artillery properly serving with this division. The battery was, however, subsequently manned and officered by Wise's brigade, under instructions from Colonel Goode, and did excellent service.

Major Haskell's mortar batteries, in charge of Captain Lamkin, consisting of four Coehorns on the Jerusalem plank road, one Coehorn and two 12-pounder mortars in the ravine some 200 yards to the left and in rear of the breach, and two mortars to the left of Wright's battery, were all opened promptly upon the enemy's columns. The practice of the four mortars on the plank road was admirable. Its shells were dropped with remarkable precision upon the enemy's masses clustering in disorder in front of and in the crater. Some three mortars on the right of the Baxter road, commanded by Lieutenant Langhorne, also opened early in the engagement, and continued to fire at intervals with good effect until its close.

As soon as I was aware that the enemy had sprung the mine and broken my line near the center I immediately communicated with the brigades in both wings of the division and directed them to extend their intervals and re-enforce the wings of Elliott's brigade, so as to give as great strength as possible to the forces on which the weight of the enemy's columns must first fall. At the same time I dispatched staff officers to the two divisions on my flanks for re-enforcements. From the left I received through Captain Saunders, aide-de-camp, the response that no re-enforcements could be furnished, as the line was already too weak. Captain Smith, acting aide-de-camp, who went to the right, promptly reported that General Mahone was moving up to our support with two brigades.

As soon as the enemy occupied the breach they attempted to advance along our trenches upon the flanks of our broken line; but our men, sheltering themselves behind the angles and flanks of our works, in the bayou running out perpendicular to the rear of our trenches, and behind the piles of earth above their bomb-proofs, opened a fatal fire on every point where the foe exposed themselves. Thus their advance was stayed, and they commenced the work of entrenching, while they still tried by more cautious means to press back our faithful and gallant men.

Brig. Gen. S. Elliott, the gallant commander of the brigade which occupied the salient, was making prompt disposition of his forces to assault the enemy and reoccupy the remaining portion of the trench cavalier when he was dangerously wounded. He had given the necessary orders for the Twenty-sixth and the left wing of the Seventeenth South Carolina Regiments to be withdrawn from the trenches, and had preceded them to the open ground to the left and in rear of the cavalier when he was struck by a rifle-ball. The command of this brigade now devolved upon Col. F. W. McMaster, of the Seventeenth South Carolina Regiment. This officer (having received the reinforcement of one regiment, sent to him by Colonel McAfee, commanding Ransom's brigade) directed Colonel Smith, of the Twenty-sixth South Carolina Regiment, to form in a ravine on the left and rear of the breach a rear line consisting of the Twenty-fifth North Carolina, Twenty-sixth South Carolina, and three companies of the Seventeenth South Carolina Regiments, arranged from left to right in the order named.

Some fourteen Federal flags were now counted on our works, and it became evident that it would be better to endeavor to hold the enemy in check until larger re-enforcements arrived than risk the disaster that might follow from an unsuccessful assault by a very inferior force without any support.......

The Sixty-first North Carolina Regiment, of Hoke's division, sent to reinforce the troops engaged at the breach, arrived at the same time with Mahone's division and proceeded to form in the ravine in rear of Pegram's salient for the purpose of charging the enemy in the breach. General Mahone had placed one brigade in position, and was waiting for the second to come up, when the enemy advanced upon his line of battle. He met their advance by a charge, in which the Twenty-fifth and Forty-ninth North Carolina and the Twenty-sixth and part of the Seventeenth South Carolina Regiments, all under Colonel Smith, of Elliott's brigade, gallantly joined, moving upon the left of General Mahone's line. The enemy was driven from three-quarters of the trench cavalier and most of the works on the left of the crater, with moderate loss to our forces and heavy losses to the enemy, especially in prisoners. During this charge a large number of the enemy's troops, black and white, abandoned the breach and fled precipitately to their rear. Upon this fleeing mass, in full view from our works on the right of the Baxter road, the left regiments of Wise's brigade poured a raking fire at the distance of from 150 to 500 yards, while the left gun of Davidson's battery (which Colonel Goode had manned with a company of the Thirty-fourth Virginia Regiment, under Capt. Samuel D. Preston) discharged upon them several rounds of canister.

It is proper here to state that Captain Preston was wounded, and Edward Bagby, aide-de-camp to Colonel Goode, commanding brigade, was killed while serving this gun, and that Capt. A. F. Bagby, with Company K, Thirty-fourth Virginia Regiment, then took charge of it and served it with fine effect until near the close of the action.

The first charge having failed in completely dislodging the enemy I ordered all of my available forces to press steadily on both flanks with a view to their final expulsion. Between 11 and 12 a.m. a second unsuccessful charge having been made by Wright's brigade, of Mahone's division, I proceeded to concert a combined movement on both flanks of the crater, to which most of the enemy's troops were now drawn. By arrangement a third charge was made a little before 2 p.m., which gave us entire possession of the crater and the adjacent lines. This charge was made on the left and rear of the crater by Sanders' brigade, of Mahone's division, by the Sixty-first North Carolina, of Hoke's division, and Seventeenth South Carolina Regiments, of this division. The last two regiments, under Major Culp, of the Seventeenth South Carolina Regiment, Elliott's brigade, advanced on the right of Sanders' brigade. These movements on the left were all placed under the direct supervision of General Mahone, while I proceeded to the right to collect what troops I could from the thin line on that flank to co-operate in the charge and divide the force of the enemy's resistance. The time allotted only permitted me to draw out the Twenty-third and the fragments of the Twenty-second South Carolina Regiment, under Captain Shedd. They moved gallantly forward as soon as the main line was seen advancing on the left, and entered the crater with the troops of that line, capturing 3 stand of colors and about 130 prisoners. Previous to this charge the incessant firing kept up by our troops on both flanks and in rear had caused many of the enemy to run the gauntlet of our cross-fires in front of the breach, but a large number still remained, unable to advance, and perhaps afraid to retreat. The final charge was therefore made with little difficulty, and resulted in the complete re-establishment of our lines and the capture of many additional prisoners.

To Major-General Hoke I am indebted for some sixty men of the Twenty-first South Carolina Regiment, who occupied about 1 p.m. a portion of the works on right of Baxter road, from which my troops were moved to the left, and also for Colonel Radcliffe's Sixty-first North Carolina Regiment, which re-enforced my command in the morning and joined the charge, as already stated.

To the able commander and gallant officers and men of Mahone's division, to whom we are mainly indebted for the restoration of our lines, I offer my acknowledgments for their great service. It is not, however, my privilege to make any further report of the operations of that division than is necessary for a proper understanding of those of my own command. B. R. JOHNSON, Major-General. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XL/1

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM JULY 5, 1864, TO JULY 31, 1864.(*)--#29 JULY 31, 1864. Captain NORTON:

The following message signaled from the enemy's station on west bank of James River near Cox's Ferry was read by Lieutenant Ireland to-day:

Flag Officer MITCHELL:

Grant sprung a mine at Petersburg at 5 a.m. yesterday; charged and took our line. Mahone with his own and Wright's brigade recaptured the works and took General Bartlett and staff, 75 commissioned officers, 900 prisoners, 12 stand colors, also recaptured the party which was taken. Five hundred Yankee dead are in the trenches. This is official. SMITH, Major. G. S. DANA, Captain, Signal Corps, U. S. Army. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XL/3

Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, dated 31 August 1864, shows the 10th Georgia Battalion under command of Captain James D. Frederick and assigned to General Wright's brigade, of General Mahone's Division of 3rd Corps, Commanded by Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill.

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS, RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM AUGUST 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.--#3 THIRD ARMY CORPS, Lieut. Gen. AMBROSE P. HILL., MAHONE'S DIVISION. Wright' s Brigade August 31, 1864.

2d Georgia Battalion, Maj. Charles J. Moffett.
10th Georgia Battalion, Capt. James D. Frederick.
3d Georgia, Col. Edward J. Walker.
22d Georgia, Col. George H. Jones.
48th Georgia, Col. William Gibson.
64th Georgia, Maj. Walter H. Weems. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/2

Also found was the assignment of Captain John Whitchard to the medical and ambulance train.

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS, RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM AUGUST 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.--#4

Third Corps headquarters: Maj. J. G. Field, corps quartermaster; Capt. W. S. P. Mayo, paymaster; Capt. John Lightfoot, reserve ordnance train; Capt. J. D. Wilder, Twenty-second North Carolina Regiment, assistant to corps quartermaster; Capt. John Whitchard, Tenth Georgia Battalion, medical and ambulance train. (O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/2)

An abstract from a Inspection Report, dated 29 September 1864, shows the 10th Georgia Battalion, under the command of Captain William A. Greer, assigned to Anderson's Division, Mahone commanding.

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS, RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM AUGUST 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.--#7 Organization of Anderson's Division. Maj. Gen. WILLIAM MAHONE. Wright's Brigade. Commanded by Col. WILLIAM GIBSON. October 31, 1864.

3d Georgia, Capt. James K. Wright.
22d Georgia, Capt. George W. Thomas.
48th Georgia, Lieut. Col. M. R. Hall.
64th Georgia, Capt. James G. Brown.
2d Georgia Battalion, Capt. George S. Jones.
10th Georgia Battalion, Capt. William A. Greer. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/2

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.-MAHONE'S DIVISION. Maj. Gen. WILLIAM MAHONE. Wright's Brigade. Col. WILLIAM GIBSON.

3d Georgia, Capt. James K. Wright.
22d Georgia, Capt. George W. Thomas.
48th Georgia, Lieut. Col. Matthew R. Hall.
64th Georgia, Capt. James G. Brown.
2d Georgia Battalion, Lieut. G. J. Peacock.
10th Georgia Battalion, Capt. William A. Greer. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/3

Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, dated 30 November 1864 shows the 10th Georgia Battalion under the command of Captain William A. Greer, assigned to 3rd Corps, Commanded by LTG Ambrose P. Hill, Mahones Division, Sorrel's Brigade and again on 31 December 1864, shows the 10th Georgia Battalion under the command of Captain Hill.

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO DECEMBER 31, 1864.--THIRD ARMY CORPS. Lieut. Gen. AMBROSE P. HILL. MAHONE'S DIVISION. Maj. Gen. WILLIAM MAHONE. Brig. Gen. G. MOXLEY SORREL.

3d Georgia, Capt. James A. Mason.
22d Georgia, Capt. George W. Thomas.
48th Georgia, Lieut. Col. Matthew R. Hall.
64th Georgia, Maj. Walter H. Weems.
2d Georgia Battalion, Capt. W. T. Walker.
10th Georgia Battalion, Capt. William A. Greer. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLII/3

Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia dated 31 January 1865, shows the 10th Georgia Battalion under Captain James D. Frederick, assigned to 3rd Corps, Commanded by Lieutenant General Ambrose P. Hill, Mahones Division, Sorrel's Brigade

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA (JANUARY 1-31), WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 15, 1865.--#7, MAHONE'S DIVISION. Maj. Gen. WILLIAM MAHONE. Sorrel's Brigade. Brig. Gen. G. MOXLEY SORREL.

3d Georgia, Col. Edward J. Walker.
22d Georgia, Col. George H. Jones.
48th Georgia, Col. William Gibson.
64th Georgia, Col. Walter H. Weems.
2d Georgia Battalion, Maj. Charles J. Moffett.
10th Georgia Battalion, Capt. James D. Frederick . O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVI/2

Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia dated 28 February 1865, shows the 10th Georgia Battalion under command of Captain Caleb F. Hill.

CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA, NORTH CAROLINA (JANUARY 1-31), WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 15, 1865.--#11, MAHONE's DIVISION. Maj. Gen. WILLIAM MAHONE. Sorrel's Brigade. Col. GEORGE E. TAYLOR.

3d Georgia, Capt. James W. Mathews.
22d Georgia, Capt. George W. Thomas.
48th Georgia, Capt. Alexander C. Flanders.
64th Georgia, Capt. Creswell A. C. Waller.
2d Georgia Battalion, Capt. George S. Jones.
10th Georgia Battalion, Capt. Caleb F. Hill. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVI/2

There were many men disabled at the battle of Sayler's Creek and it surrendered with 4 officers and 155 men. Documentation of General Robert E. Lee's surrender, and speech to his troops, 10 April 1865, also shows 10th Georgia Battalion under Captain Caleb F. Hill at Appomattox for the surrender.

MARCH 29-APRIL 9, 1865.--The Appomattox (Virginia) Campaign. No. 268.--Organization of the C. S. Forces, commanded by General Robert E. Lee. MAHONE'S DIVISION. Maj. Gen. WILLIAM MAHONE. Sorrel's Brigade. Col. GEORGE E. TAYLOR.

3d Georgia, Lieut. Col. Claiborne Snead.
22d Georgia, Capt. George W. Thomas.
48th Georgia, Capt. Alexander C. Flanders.
64th Georgia, Capt. James G. Brown.
2d Georgia Battalion, Maj. Charles J. Moffett.
10th Georgia Battalion, Capt. Caleb F. Hill. O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVI/1
[Extracted from John Griffin's history]

Formation & Organization | Orders & Movements | Soldier's Letters | Obituaries | Top


Letters written by Michael L. Hambrick, Company A

[From the Georgia Archives courtesy of Dennis Miller. M.L. Hambrick died April 1863.]

In camps near Richmond Va.

This March the 1st 1863

Dear Mother I again seat my self to drop you a few lines which leaves me well I hope these lines will come to hand and find you all enjoying the best of health I havent got nothing of importance to rite to you more than we have a great deal of bad weather here it is snowing or reigning nearly half the time but from what I have heard of the weather there I think it has been as cold there as it has here it aint half as cold here as I expected to find it we had a very bad time a marching from Fredricks Burg we was five days on the road and 2 of them it reigned an snowed and the worst roads I ever saw in my life there is several of the boys went to the horsepittle sens we stopt but nun from our settlement but James White he had chills John Oliver is haveing the chills he is at a privet house they have to go to the horsepittle when they get sick for they canet take care of them selves in camps we are campt a bout five miles south of richmond we cant tell how long we will stay here nor where we will go to from here there is no talk of a fite here now the yankeys is gawn from about here some think we will have to go down to savanah but I am in hopes we will soon get to come home there is a great talk of peace I want to know what is the reason you dont rite to me I havent received narry letter from you sens Larken Brown come and I am tired riteing an cant get no answers I have rote one last Sunday I want you to rite as soon as you get this letter and rite all the knews I started a letter to uncle Levi last Thursday. --M.L. Hambrick

Dear sister I now take the oppertunity to riteing you a few lines which leaves me well I hope this will find all well and doing well I never got the chance to rite to you while you were in Jones Co. John Mims got here Fryday he sed you stayed at his house the nite before he left he brought me that pretty ---- but he didnot say who sent it me an Mr. J.B. Barfield eat it it made me sick for a while Mat Martin was here this morning he is in the 20th Ga. Reg. Robbirt Holiway is here close to us I havent seen hem but some of the boys has seen hem. I will close for this time I want you to see if you cant send me a letter as many of you as there is there it looks hard that I cant hear from more of you. Gan ma I want you to make some them rite to me I have sent two pens home and I have sent money to pay the postage till the war ends and I want you to rite how you are getting on I was to hear that Jerry was burnt to death I think you an Dony can give me pretty good letter sorry you have taken your visit I think if I could see you I tell you a good deal of what I seen sens I saw you last I am in hopes I will have the oppertunity of seeing all before long I must close for this time. --M.L. Hambrick

 

Taylor I want you to rite me how you are getting on with your work whether you are ready to plant corn or not and rite whether you have planted the cain or not an where you planted it and what you done with mine Sam I want you to rite how the pigs looks an whether you can ride selum or not and who is the over seer you or Taylor I will close for this time. --M.L. Hambrick

--------------------------------

In camps hear Richmond Va.

March the 15th 1863.

More Letter transcripts coming soon...

 

 

Formation & Organization | Orders & Movements | Soldier's Letters | Obituaries | Top


Obituaries

Jesse Bud Barfield Obituary

The Butler Herald: Volume 29, # 11, January 17, 1905 [Source: Davine V. Cambell

Abstracted: by Marilyn Neilser Windham. [ 17Jan1905 was a Tuesday --Steve Scroggins ]

J. B. Barfield died at his home on Monday. Had a stroke of paralysis. Was 65 years of age. Leaves wife and 5 sons and 2 daughters, Messrs. William, Berry, John, Thomas, and Monroe Barfield. Miss Mary Eliza[Liza] and Mrs. Isiah[Isaac] Barfield.

Burial in Barfield-Shepherd Cemeteries, Whitewater Creek, Macon County, GA (off GA127); also buried there are (*as listed) BARFIELD: Allen s/Enos b.1848 (no death date); W. 7months; Donice G. 32 months; George L. 4 months; Georgia Ann W/Allen (*note do not know if this means wife or widow of 'Allen'?); b. 3 Dec 1853 d.19 Feb 1890; James Owen b. 8 Feb 1868 d. 26 May 1889; Jesse Bud* b. 1836 d. 1905; Lester R. 3 days; Rebecca Ann Brooks b. 7Sep 1841 d. 26 Nov 1890; First name is 'T'. middle is (R or D?) 7 mos 5 days; Tommy S. 7 days. [---Susan Register Collier ]

Nelson H. Barfield Obituary

Posted by Davine V. Campbell <mailto:davine@corinthian.net> <davine@corinthian.net> on Thu, 29 Apr 1999, in response to Mrs. Berta Barfield Obituary </~genbbs/genbbs.cgi/USA/Ga/MaconObits?read=479>, posted by Davine V. Campbell on Fri, 16 Apr 1999

Macon County Citizen - Oglethorpe, Ga. July 13, 1917
NELSON H. BARFIELD IS DEAD
On Friday afternoon, July 6th, after a long illness Nelson H. Barfield passed away. He was born Nov. 23, 1839 and at the time of his death was 77 years, 7 months and 13 days old. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Lockwood on Sept. 27, 1866, she having died on August 7, 1890.
Three daughters were born to Mr. And Mrs. Barfield, Sarah Beth Barfield , (deceased)[1867-1872], Mrs. G. W. N. Watkins and Miss Berta Barfield. He had two brothers; one is dead, W. W. Barfield, and one living, A. B. Barfield of Coverdale, Ga., three sisters, one of whom is dead, Miss Sylvania Barfield. The living are Mrs. E. T. Killebrew of Norman park, Ga. And Mrs. J. D. Newton of Moultris, Ga.
Mr. Barfield was a Confederate veteran, having served in the civil war in the Tenth Georgia Battalion in Co. A
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. D. E. Green at the grave Saturday afternoon and the body laid to rest in the presence of a large congregation of relatives and friends.
[Note: Nelson H. Barfield - Born November 23, 1839 - Died July 6, 1917 CSA is buried in Ideal Cemetery between his wife, Elizabeth (Lockwood) Barfield [1844-1890] and his daughter Berta Barfield [No dates but born about 1875 & died October 1935]

 

Formation & Organization | Orders & Movements | Soldier's Letters | Obituaries | Top


Sources: Dennis Miller, John Griffin, Davine V. Campbell , Civil War Macon by Iobst, Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia by Folsom. Macon County, Georgia Genealogy , Official Records, Index to Georgia Confederate Pension Files transcribed by Virgil D. White, The National Historical Publishing Co., Waynesboro, TN - 1996, Georgia Confederate Soldiers 1861-1865 - Unit Roster Volume III pp. 168-169 by Janet B. Hewett, Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, NC, 1998.

 


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